Thoughts Worth Thinking About

I was just chatting with a friend about software, infrastructure, modern architectures and methodologies, and just sysadmin stuff in general. After getting up for a few minutes to grab a drink, here’s what I found waiting for me in the chat room. I’m sharing it, with his permission:

 


I find it funny. Everyone is like, “my servers are cattle, not pets”, “no snowflakes” and “use Docker,” with the result that the infrastrcture and host systems are the worst form of this. xD

But to be honest, I am realizing that the cattle/pet thing is wrong. I want my server to be a shepherd dog and my processes/services to be cattle. I want my dog to be smart and take care of things and be reliable, exactly because my cattle isn’t.

I want it to do the right thing at the right moment and in the right way. I want to improve my servers every time something goes wrong and not have them be as dumb as the first time it happened.

And the snowflake. No, I don’t want my system to be like every other. In that case I would just make a distro that is like that and just install it. No architecture/design of system/infrastructure required.

It’s like.. just using WordPress instead of starting your own thing. “But that way it’s easier, and you don’t have your snowflake web app.”

Oh and you can google stack traces.

Why program at all?

It’s also a bit like when people thought it was a good idea to use Microsoft Office (or early versions of Frontpage) to make web pages. xD

The WP comparison probably also works with OSs. “Why not just use Ubuntu” is like “why not just use WP?” Big community, widely used language.


 

It’s worth considering. Thinking carefully about fads and hype, before going along with them, is a good thing. And even if a lot of these technologies and approaches have merit, they are not a ‘one size fits all’ answer. If something doesn’t make sense to you, always ask more questions, do more research, and try things out yourself. That’s what makes us better than machines :-).

How to Record Your Work on the Command Line with the script(1) Command

Most Unix-like operating systems feature a script command. You can find its manual in script(1) (type man 1 script to access it). script records a transcript (“typescript,” not to be confused with the language TypeScript) of your current session in the command line.

The script command can be used as a way to log what you are doing in a shell session. It’s often used during troubleshooting, documentation, PCI compliance audits, security/remediation work, penetration tests, and other situations where it’s useful to record a play-by-play log of what you’re doing on the machine.

 

Practical Demonstration

 

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I spent some time migrating an application from sqlite3 to Postgres today, and wanted to write down a few notes for next time. Here they are!

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Today I Learned: ZFS send/receive is Like rsync, but Developed by a Much More Evolved Species

If you use ZFS, you already know that it completely knocks the socks off of other filesystems. It prevents and corrects data corruption, gives you incredible flexibility, and basically gives you everything you could ever want from a filesystem. If you use OpenZFS on several systems already, you probably know about the ‘send’ and ‘receive’ commands to do incremental transfer of snapshots between systems.

Here’s a great video on ZFS send and receive, which goes much deeper than most videos into how send and receive are implemented, along with some clever ideas for use cases where send/receive can really save you a lot of time and pain.

Because being able to mimic $50,000 enterprise filesystem replication on your home NAS or your little ‘friends-and-family’ WordPress hosting server is pretty effing cool.

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